Research Finds That An Average Child has Eaten 18 Years of Sugar by The Age of 10

Research Finds That An Average Child has Eaten 18 Years of Sugar by The Age of 10

New research shows that British children have consumed 18 years’ worth of sugar by the time they reach the age of 10.

Data from Public Health England demonstrates that the average child eats the equivalent of about eight excess sugar cubes daily.

Specialists said that breakfasts full with sugary cereals, fruit juice and jams were accountable for much of the consumption, with the average child having had half the recommended allowance before they even began their school day.

PHE suggests that children aged between four and 10 have a maximum of five to six sugar cubes a day – between 19 and 24 grams.

But the study from the national diet and nutrition survey demonstrates that on average, those this age is eating more than 52 grams of sugar daily.

The intake volume is about 2,800 extra cubes per year – with the average child eating at least 138 kilos of sugar by the age of 10.

Research Finds That An Average Child has Eaten 18 Years of Sugar by The Age of 10 Mid

If consumption was in line with suggested limits, they would not reach this point until they were 18.

It follows cautions that severe obesity in ten-to-eleven-year olds has touched a record high – with nearly one child in 20 now classed this way.

One in three primary school students is overweight or obese by the time they leave school.

Health officials urged parents to act to cut their children’s sugar intake, by substituting sweet appetizers for healthier options.

The innovative Change4Life Sugar Swaps campaign will inspire families to “Make a swap when you next shop”. · The movement will see the announcement of a new TV, radio and digital advertising

Recommended swaps contain low sugar yoghurts, instead of split pot forms with fruit corners, substituting juices with added sugar with those without it, and substituting sugary breakfast cereals like frosted and chocolate flakes for low sugar options.

Malt loaf, sugar-free jellies, lower-sugar custards and rice puddings are amongst the snacks being supported by health officials.

Consumers are being encouraged to look for the Change4Life “Good Choice” badge in shops, download the free Food Scanner app or search Change4Life to help them find lower sugar options.

Health officials are required to be working with the food manufacturers to eliminate 20 per cent of sugar from the foods which donate towards children’s sugar intakes by 2020.

But until now, sugar content has fallen by only 2 per cent, in contradiction of a target to attain a 5 per cent fall in a year.

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